July242014
Ooooh, pretty!
dinodorks:

Mammoth by DanielKarlsson

Ooooh, pretty!

dinodorks:

Mammoth by DanielKarlsson

July232014
More studies!
scinewscom:

DNA Study Reveals Diet of Ice Age Megafaunahttp://www.sci-news.com/genetics/science-diet-ice-age-megafauna-01748.html

More studies!

scinewscom:

DNA Study Reveals Diet of Ice Age Megafauna

http://www.sci-news.com/genetics/science-diet-ice-age-megafauna-01748.html

July222014
Neat.
meatyelbow:

Caveman Run Cycle

Neat.

meatyelbow:

Caveman Run Cycle

July212014
To infinity and beyond!
wolfsonart:

Space mammoth art card for meatyelbow.

To infinity and beyond!

wolfsonart:

Space mammoth art card for meatyelbow.

July202014
I think I’ve posted this previously, but the snails say it’s worth another look.
laboratoryequipment:

Domestication of Dogs Linked to Mammoth Kills, Success of HumansA new analysis of European archaeological sites containing large numbers of dead mammoths and dwellings built with mammoth bones has led Pennsylvania State Univ. Prof. Emerita Pat Shipman to formulate a new interpretation of how these sites were formed. She suggests that their abrupt appearance may have been because of early modern humans working with the earliest domestic dogs to kill the mammoth — a now-extinct animal distantly related to the modern-day elephant. Shipman’s analysis also provides a way to test the predictions of her new hypothesis. Advance publication of her article is available online through Quaternary International.Spectacular archaeological sites yielding stone tools and extraordinary numbers of dead mammoths — some containing the remains of hundreds of individuals — suddenly became common in central and eastern Eurasia between about 45,000 and 15,000 years ago, although mammoths previously had been hunted by humans and their extinct relatives and ancestors for at least a million years. Some of these mysterious sites have huts built of mammoth bones in complex, geometric patterns as well as piles of butchered mammoth bones.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/domestication-dogs-linked-mammoth-kills-success-humans

I think I’ve posted this previously, but the snails say it’s worth another look.

laboratoryequipment:

Domestication of Dogs Linked to Mammoth Kills, Success of Humans

A new analysis of European archaeological sites containing large numbers of dead mammoths and dwellings built with mammoth bones has led Pennsylvania State Univ. Prof. Emerita Pat Shipman to formulate a new interpretation of how these sites were formed. She suggests that their abrupt appearance may have been because of early modern humans working with the earliest domestic dogs to kill the mammoth — a now-extinct animal distantly related to the modern-day elephant. Shipman’s analysis also provides a way to test the predictions of her new hypothesis. Advance publication of her article is available online through Quaternary International.

Spectacular archaeological sites yielding stone tools and extraordinary numbers of dead mammoths — some containing the remains of hundreds of individuals — suddenly became common in central and eastern Eurasia between about 45,000 and 15,000 years ago, although mammoths previously had been hunted by humans and their extinct relatives and ancestors for at least a million years. Some of these mysterious sites have huts built of mammoth bones in complex, geometric patterns as well as piles of butchered mammoth bones.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/domestication-dogs-linked-mammoth-kills-success-humans

July192014
Are you my mummy?
pokerdemonos:

Degenesis Mammoth with Gasmaskby KlausScherwinski

Are you my mummy?

pokerdemonos:

Degenesis Mammoth with Gasmask
by KlausScherwinski

July182014
And another study.
oosik:

Neck ribs in woolly mammoths provide clues about their decline and eventual extinction
NATURAL WORLD March 25, 2014 

Researchers recently noticed that the remains of woolly mammoths from the North Sea often possess a ‘cervical’ (neck) rib—in fact, 10 times more frequently than in modern elephants (33.3% versus 3.3%).
In modern animals, these cervical ribs are often associated with inbreeding and adverse environmental conditions during pregnancy. If the same factors were behind the anomalies in mammoths, this reproductive stress could have further pushed declining mammoth populations towards ultimate extinction.
Mammals, even the long-necked giraffes and the short-necked dolphins, almost always have seven neck vertebrae (exceptions being sloths, manatees and dugongs), and these vertebrae do not normally possess a rib. Therefore, the presence of a ‘cervical rib’ (a rib attached to a cervical vertebra) is an unusual event, and is cause for further investigation. A cervical rib itself is relatively harmless, but its development often follows genetic or environmental disturbances during early embryonic development. As a result, cervical ribs in most mammals are strongly associated with stillbirths and multiple congenital abnormalities that negatively impact the lifespan of an individual.
Researchers from the Rotterdam Museum of Natural History and the Naturalis Biodiversity Center in Leiden examined mammoth and modern elephant neck vertebrae from several European museum collections. “It had aroused our curiosity to find two cervical vertebrae, with large articulation facets for ribs, in the mammoth samples recently dredged from the North Sea.
We knew these were just about the last mammoths living there, so we suspected something was happening. Our work now shows that there was indeed a problem in this population”, said Jelle Reumer, one of the authors on the study published today in the open access journal PeerJ.
The incidence of abnormal cervical vertebrae in mammoths is much higher than in the modern sample, strongly suggesting a vulnerable condition in the species. Potential factors could include inbreeding (in what is assumed to have been an already small population) as well as harsh conditions such as disease, famine, or cold, all of which can lead to disturbances of embryonic and fetal development. Given the considerable birth defects that are associated with this condition, it is very possible that developmental abnormalities contributed towards the eventual extinction of these late Pleistocene mammoths.
The peer-reviewed study, entitled “Extraordinary incidence of cervical ribs indicates vulnerable condition in Late Pleistocene mammoths” was authored by Jelle Reumer of the Rotterdam Museum of Natural History and Clara ten Broek and Frietson Galis of Naturalis Biodiversity Center (Leiden).
Source

And another study.

oosik:

Neck ribs in woolly mammoths provide clues about their decline and eventual extinction

Researchers recently noticed that the remains of woolly mammoths from the North Sea often possess a ‘cervical’ (neck) rib—in fact, 10 times more frequently than in modern elephants (33.3% versus 3.3%).

In modern animals, these cervical ribs are often associated with inbreeding and adverse environmental conditions during pregnancy. If the same factors were behind the anomalies in mammoths, this reproductive stress could have further pushed declining mammoth populations towards ultimate extinction.

Mammals, even the long-necked giraffes and the short-necked dolphins, almost always have seven neck vertebrae (exceptions being sloths, manatees and dugongs), and these vertebrae do not normally possess a rib. Therefore, the presence of a ‘cervical rib’ (a rib attached to a cervical vertebra) is an unusual event, and is cause for further investigation. A cervical rib itself is relatively harmless, but its development often follows genetic or environmental disturbances during early embryonic development. As a result, cervical ribs in most mammals are strongly associated with stillbirths and multiple congenital abnormalities that negatively impact the lifespan of an individual.

Researchers from the Rotterdam Museum of Natural History and the Naturalis Biodiversity Center in Leiden examined mammoth and modern elephant neck vertebrae from several European museum collections. “It had aroused our curiosity to find two cervical vertebrae, with large articulation facets for ribs, in the mammoth samples recently dredged from the North Sea.

We knew these were just about the last mammoths living there, so we suspected something was happening. Our work now shows that there was indeed a problem in this population”, said Jelle Reumer, one of the authors on the study published today in the open access journal PeerJ.

The incidence of abnormal cervical vertebrae in mammoths is much higher than in the modern sample, strongly suggesting a vulnerable condition in the species. Potential factors could include inbreeding (in what is assumed to have been an already small population) as well as harsh conditions such as disease, famine, or cold, all of which can lead to disturbances of embryonic and fetal development. Given the considerable birth defects that are associated with this condition, it is very possible that developmental abnormalities contributed towards the eventual extinction of these late Pleistocene mammoths.

The peer-reviewed study, entitled “Extraordinary incidence of cervical ribs indicates vulnerable condition in Late Pleistocene mammoths” was authored by Jelle Reumer of the Rotterdam Museum of Natural History and Clara ten Broek and Frietson Galis of Naturalis Biodiversity Center (Leiden).

Source

July172014

Check it out, @hirst_shark.

designboom:

damien hirst gilds golden woolly mammoth skeleton
photo by prudence cuming associates © damien hirst and science ltd

read more about the blinged out beast here: http://www.designboom.com/art/damien-hirst-gilds-golden-woolly-mammoth-skeleton-05-20-2014/

July162014
And another!
brains-and-bodies:

From Science News Magazine




When flowers died out in Arctic, so did mammoths. Genetic analysis finds vegetation change around same time as megafauna extinction: http://ow.ly/tnQvI 


Credit: PER MÖLLER/JOHANNA ANJAR

And another!

brains-and-bodies:

From Science News Magazine

When flowers died out in Arctic, so did mammoths. Genetic analysis finds vegetation change around same time as megafauna extinction: http://ow.ly/tnQvI 

Credit: PER MÖLLER/JOHANNA ANJAR
July152014
And another theory.
rhamphotheca:

Woolly Mammoths Wiped Out by Grass Invasion?
Tundra and steppe turning to less-nutritious grasses may have contributed to extinction of ancient Arctic beasts.
by Dan Vergano
Grasslands suddenly spreading across the Arctic about 10,000 years ago helped killed off the woolly mammoth and other prehistoric mammals, suggests a study of ancient Arctic vegetation.
Climate warming after the Ice Age, prehistoric hunters, and even a comet impact have been proposed as reasons for the extinction of the mammoth, woolly rhinoceros, and other oversized “megafauna” that once inhabited Siberia and North America’s far northern plains.
The new DNA analysis of Arctic vegetation over the past 50,000 years, published in Nature by a team led by Eske Willerslev of the University of Copenhagen, offers a new wrinkle on the climate-warming theory: The great beasts vanished because they weren’t getting enough of the right food…
(read more: click above image)

And another theory.

rhamphotheca:

Woolly Mammoths Wiped Out by Grass Invasion?

Tundra and steppe turning to less-nutritious grasses may have contributed to extinction of ancient Arctic beasts.

by Dan Vergano

Grasslands suddenly spreading across the Arctic about 10,000 years ago helped killed off the woolly mammoth and other prehistoric mammals, suggests a study of ancient Arctic vegetation.

Climate warming after the Ice Age, prehistoric hunters, and even a comet impact have been proposed as reasons for the extinction of the mammoth, woolly rhinoceros, and other oversized “megafauna” that once inhabited Siberia and North America’s far northern plains.

The new DNA analysis of Arctic vegetation over the past 50,000 years, published in Nature by a team led by Eske Willerslev of the University of Copenhagen, offers a new wrinkle on the climate-warming theory: The great beasts vanished because they weren’t getting enough of the right food…

(read more: click above image)

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